In Pictures: Spectacular Northern Lights

Stargazers were delighted from the recent spectacular sky shows as the Northern Lights had been supercharged by a solar storm.

The northern lights, supercharged by a recent solar storm, dance above Naimakka, Finland, in this shot snapped on Sept. 4, 2012, by Ole Salomonsen.

The Northern Lights, also known as Aurora Borealis, occurs when energy particles from the sun interact with the earth’s magnetic field. Recently, the Aurora Borealis had been supercharged by a solar storm. It was the strongest solar storm in six years!

I’ve never seen the Northern Lights before and I really hope that one day I will get to see it…

Here are some pictures of the spectacular Aurora:

p/s: Click the pictures for a larger image

The aurora borealis is seen over the town of Hyvinkaa in southern Finland October 31, 2003. The aurora is very visible at the moment as a result of a second huge magnetic solar storm hitting the Earth on Thursday. REUTERS/ LEHTIKUVA / Pekka Sakki

In this photo taken Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011, the aurora borealis, or northern lights, light up the sky above the village of Ersfjordbotn, near Tromso, northern Norway.

The aurora borealis, or Northern Lights, are seen near the city of Tromsoe, northern Norway, late Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012. Stargazers were out in force in northern Europe on Tuesday, hoping to be awed by a spectacular showing of northern lights after the most powerful solar storm in six years. (AP Photo/Scanpix Norway, Rune Stoltz Bertinussen) NORWAY OUT

The aurora borealis, or Northern Lights, are seen near the city of Tromsoe, northern Norway, late Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012. Stargazers were out in force in northern Europe on Tuesday, hoping to be awed by a spectacular showing of northern lights after the most powerful solar storm in six years. (AP Photo/Scanpix Norway, Rune Stoltz Bertinussen) NORWAY OUT

An Aurora Borealis spins above the Talkeetna Range and a hay field on Farm Loop Road near Palmer, Alaska, on Friday, Feb. 29, 2008. The center of the circular corona, usually near Earth’s north pole sometimes fluctuates further south and can be seen from a lower latitude as in this instance. (AP Photo/Bob Martinson)

Feedbacks?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s